Social Work and the Environment

Understanding People and Place

By Michael Kim Zapf

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Description

This ground-breaking new work provides a detailed and extensive comparison of how the physical environment has been conceptualized in social work and other professions, and offers a new and attractive foundational metaphor for social work. The author acknowledges the need for greater awareness and action regarding environmental impacts and the book promotes more comprehensive notions of responsibility, identity, and stewardship that lead to a dynamic metaphor of people as place as the foundation for relevant social work practice in the early 21st century.

Why is that a profession with a declared focus on "person-in-environment" has been so silent on the environmental crisis?

Mainstream social work theory has narrowed the understanding of environment to include merely the social environment, but this approach is no longer sufficient for participation in multi-disciplinary efforts to tackle urgent environmental issues.

Transformative notions of responsibility, identity, and stewardship have been developed on the fringes of our professional community: rural/remote social workers, Aboriginal social workers, and international and spiritual social workers. They must now move to the core of the profession.

Details

Number of Pages

300

Dimensions

15.24 " x 22.86”

print ISBN

9781551303574

PDF ISBN

9781551304304

Subjects

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